New York

New York

Roberto Cuoghi

New Museum
235 Bowery
April 30–June 29, 2014

Curated by Massimiliano Gioni and Margot Norton

There really is no one like Roberto Cuoghi, the brilliant Italian weirdo who launched his career as an artist by transforming himself into his own father. Physically. I will never forget encountering the young man on a terrace in Turin, a bit chunky with a gray beard, wearing a 1970s-style suit and glasses. He looked sixty-five. More recent projects are just as demanding and peculiar. Who else would spend two years learning ancient Assyrian well enough to write and perform an imaginary lament from 612 BC, accompanying the singing with his own re-creations of ancient and arcane instruments? The resulting sound piece, Šuillakku—corral version, 2008–14, will debut at the New Museum, where it will fill the entirety of the third floor, installed in an immersive, circular room constructed for the occasion. A catalogue with essays by cocurator Margot Norton, Alison M. Gingeras, and artist Thomas Grünfeld accompanies the show.