New York

New York

“Kehinde Wiley: A New Republic”

Brooklyn Museum
200 Eastern Parkway
February 20–May 24, 2015

Curated by Eugenie Tsai

In last year’s PBS documentary Kehinde Wiley: An Economy of Grace, one of the artist’s associates offhandedly introduces him to a stranger in New York as “the black Andy Warhol.” Not only has Wiley’s work become singularly recognizable (since emerging in the early 2000s), but the artist also shares with the King of Pop an utter reliance on the charismatic, glimmering stars of the street. In his first museum survey, at the site of his first institutional solo show in 2004, Wiley will present approximately sixty works, including recent pieces in bronze and stained glass. But the focal point will be his paintings, extravagant mash-ups of Nike billboards and rococo pomp. Early on, these featured languidly posing African American men scouted from street-canvassing sessions; they now include international subjects as well as—in a significant breakthrough—women. A catalogue with texts by Jeffrey Deitch, Franklin Sirmans, Deborah Willis, and more should add context to Wiley’s uniquely consistent yet variegated practice. Travels to the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, Sept. 20, 2015–Jan. 10, 2016; and other venues.