New York

Laurie Simmons, How We See/Liz/Coral, 2014, ink-jet print, 70 × 48".

Laurie Simmons, How We See/Liz/Coral, 2014, ink-jet print, 70 × 48".

New York

“Laurie Simmons: How We See”

The Jewish Museum
1109 Fifth Avenue
March 13–August 9, 2015

Curated by Kelly Taxter

Laurie Simmons’s sustained investigation into both physical and psychological artifice—from the figurines and miniaturized architectural environments pictured in her early photos to her later deployment of anatomically accurate “love dolls” as actors in oddly poignant domestic dramas around her own home—has a certain conceptual and spatial trajectory to it, and her decision in recent years to begin working with human subjects represents a logical, intriguing turn in her provocative practice. Characteristically looking to trouble questions of identity and presentation, the photographs in “How We See” build on a suite of portraits the artist first exhibited last year, for which she drew on the cosplay form known in Japan as kigurumi. The recent, large-scale images depict a series of “doll girls” with wide, Margaret Keane–style eyes carefully painted on their closed lids—modified bodies located at the uncanny point where the “natural” comes in contact with the emerging technologies and habits of posthumanist self-representation.