Paris

Takis, Antigravité, 1969, wood, metal, magnet, nails, dimensions variable. Photo: Nishan Bishajian. © ADAGP, Paris.

Takis, Antigravité, 1969, wood, metal, magnet, nails, dimensions variable. Photo: Nishan Bishajian. © ADAGP, Paris.

Paris

“Takis: Magnetic Fields”

Palais de Tokyo
13, Avenue du Président Wilson
February 18–May 17, 2015

Curated by Alfred Pacquement

Pulled toward electromagnets yet restrained by wires, the suspended metal cones and needles of Takis’s “Télésculptures” seem to quiver with absurd and frustrated desire.The Greek artist settled in France in 1954 and, with sculptures involving magnetism, light, and sound, became a leading figure in the kinetic art movement of the 1950s and ’60s. Now, twenty-two years after his last major retrospective, the Palais de Tokyo offers a welcome opportunity to reassess Takis’s work at a moment when contemporaries such as Lygia Clark and the German postwar group Zero are receiving high-profile surveys. With approximately sixty works dating from 1960 to the present, the galleries will surely hum with what William S. Burroughs described as Takis’s “cold blue mineral music of thinking metal.”