New York

Diane Arbus, Taxicab driver at the wheel with two passengers, N.Y.C., 1956, gelatin silver print, 6 1/8 × 8 7/8". © The Estate of Diane Arbus, LLC.

Diane Arbus, Taxicab driver at the wheel with two passengers, N.Y.C., 1956, gelatin silver print, 6 1/8 × 8 7/8". © The Estate of Diane Arbus, LLC.

New York

“Diane Arbus: In the Beginning”

The Met Breuer
945 Madison Avenue
July 12–November 27, 2016

Curated by Jeff L. Rosenheim

We know Diane Arbus for her square-format photographs of “freaks” and “normals,” taken in the 1960s, with which she created an inimitable style of personal confrontation with her subjects, markedly different from that of her “new-document,” street-photographing contemporaries. What we know less about are her beginnings, after she worked as a stylist for her fashion-photographer husband Allan Arbus, who gave her a camera when she was just eighteen. More than one hundred of the photographs she took with a 35-mm camera between 1956—when she numbered a roll of such film “#1”—and 1962, which marked the beginning of a decade of iconic Rolleiflex work, will be on view at the new Met Breuer this summer. The exhibition will be accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue of photographs largely drawn from the Metropolitan’s massive archive of Arbus’s prints, with essays by the curator and researcher Karan Rinaldo.