previews

  • Robert Rauschenberg

    Tate Modern
    Bankside
    December 1 - April 2

    Curated by Achim Borchardt-Hume and Leah Dickerman

    When this Tate retrospective opens, it will have been nearly two decades since the last such effort: the sprawling megashow mounted by the Solomon R. Guggenheim in 1997. Ushered in by Walter Hopps’s extraordinary exhibition focused on Rauschenberg’s earliest career, at the institution’s downtown branch, the 1990s effected an enduring place for the artist among the greats of the later twentieth century. Subsequent projects, such as the Metropolitan’s exhaustive presentation of the Combines, have ramified the artist’s interpretative exhibition history perhaps more deeply than that of any comparable figure. The bar is thus set high for this joint venture with MoMA, as both a synthesis of accumulated insight and an adumbration of new possibilities for thinking about the work. MoMA will emphasize lesser-known chapters in Rauschenberg’s oeuvre, while the Tate promises a full, if “tightly edited,” account of his entire career trajectory, with unprecedented emphasis on performance and collaborations. Travels to the Museum of Modern Art, New York, May 21–Sept. 4. 2017; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Nov. 4, 2017–Mar. 25, 2018.

  • “William Kentridge: Thick Time”

    Whitechapel Gallery
    77 - 82 Whitechapel High Street
    September 21 - January 15

    Curated by Iwona Blazwick and Sabine Breitwieser

    Stretching time. Unwinding it. Reminding us how we all dance against the drumbeat of our ticking hearts. William Kentridge has claimed for the past three decades that his work is “all about time.” This exhibition, named for the Bakhtinian processes the artist uses to describe the viscous temporalities of his studio, plumbs the depths of Kentridgean time. His clock is, of course, set to the willful time of southern Africa—its peculiar dilations and coagulations, its leaps and surges, its refusals of Greenwich’s imperial cadence. A rich lineup of voices (Homi K. Bhabha, Achille Mbembe, and more) will provide meditations around the exhibition’s six landmark works, all made between 2003 and 2015, including O Sentimental Machine, which stars Leon Trotsky, exiled in Istanbul, spouting endless messages to the “masses” he perceived (with fateful narrowness) as sentimental machines. Travels to the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Humlebæk, Denmark, Feb. 16–June 18, 2017; Museum der Moderne Salzburg Mönchsberg, Austria, July 22–Nov. 5, 2017; Whitworth, Manchester, UK, 2018.