New York

Donald Judd, untitled, 1960, oil on canvas, 70 × 47 7⁄8". © Judd Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Donald Judd, untitled, 1960, oil on canvas, 70 × 47 7⁄8". © Judd Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

New York

“Judd”

MoMA - The Museum of Modern Art
11 West 53rd Street
March 1–July 11, 2020

Curated by Ann Temkin and Yasmil Raymond with Tamar Margalit and Erica Cooke

This spring, the sole Donald Judd retrospective in the US in three decades—titled “Judd,” in perfect step with the artist’s trademark directness—will offer many visitors their first chance to see a holistic presentation of the practice that has had such a massive impact on contemporary art and culture at large. Judd’s legacy as a crucial hinge between modernism and its postmedium aftermath has seemingly been exhaustively assessed, but by tracing the whole arc of his practice—with sixty paintings, sculptures, and drawings from his thirty-year career—MoMA promises to explore its radicality and complexity, which Judd’s affiliation with Minimalism, a movement now more or less thoroughly co-opted as design, may have obscured. As contemporary art wrestles with its own radicality and complexity, or lack thereof, there couldn’t be a better time to revisit an artist who doggedly confronted form, presence, and politics, both on the page and in “real space.”