previews

  • Óscar Sánchez Gómez, untitled, 2001, gelatin silver print, 16 × 20". From “The Seropositive Files (Visualizing HIV in Mexico).”

    Óscar Sánchez Gómez, untitled, 2001, gelatin silver print, 16 × 20". From “The Seropositive Files (Visualizing HIV in Mexico).”

    “The Seropositive Files (Visualizing HIV in Mexico)”

    Museo Universitario Arte Contemporaneo (MUAC)
    Insurgentes Sur 3000 Centro Cultural UniversitarioDelegación Coyoacán
    February 1–May 31, 2020

    Curated by Sol Henaro and Luis Matus

    The Mexican government’s recent reforms on drug procurement have highlighted that HIV education, treatment, and prevention in the country remain inadequate, as the virus continues to affect a significant portion of the population. More importantly, the sociocultural impact of HIV/AIDS has also stagnated in the national imagination. The exhibition “The Seropositive Files (Visualizing HIV in Mexico)” aims to address this imbalance. In its five thematic sections, visitors will be able to see some two hundred documentaries, artworks, records, and mass-media materials created since the 1970s that will illuminate the differences in medical, governmental, civilian, and artistic responses to the virus. The show will be complemented by a publication and a series of public programs involving artists and other cultural practitioners.

  • “RUBÉN ORTIZ-TORRES: CUSTOMATISMO (DISTORSIÓN MUTUA ASEGURADA)”

    Museo Universitario Arte Contemporaneo (MUAC)
    Insurgentes Sur 3000 Centro Cultural UniversitarioDelegación Coyoacán
    October 26, 2019–March 15, 2020

    Curated by Mariana Botey

    Rubén Ortiz-Torres was born in Mexico in 1964 and moved to Los Angeles in the 1990s, at a time when he and his peers, such as Gabriel Orozco, were being brought into the fold of the international art world. His work responded to that context, exploring (trans)national identities as constellations of cultural influences, and became emblematic of how we actually live—in hemispheres rather than in countries. For Ortiz-Torres’s first institutional retrospective, accompanied by an extensive catalogue, curator Mariana Botey will bring together Ortiz-Torres’s early paintings, which conflate a modernist aesthetic with an “authentic” Mexican folk style, crossing spiritually symbolic shapes with Catholic iconography; the travelogue film Frontierland, 1995, made with Jesse Lerner and highlighting a mestizo aesthetic specific to the US-Mexico border; fantastic, lowrider-influenced hydraulic hopping machines from the ’90s and early aughts; and more paintings and sculptures from the past decade, which use mesmerizing thermochromatic pigments. The show is sure to remind us that the true Aztlán is not in Mexico, nor in America, but in the Americas.