previews

  • Derek Fordjour, Five Down Wide, 2019, acrylic, charcoal, oil pastel, and foil on newspaper mounted on canvas, 40 × 100".

    Derek Fordjour, Five Down Wide, 2019, acrylic, charcoal, oil pastel, and foil on newspaper mounted on canvas, 40 × 100".

    “Derek Fordjour: Shelter”

    Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis
    3750 Washington Blvd.
    January 17–April 19, 2020

    Curated by Wassan Al-Khudhairi with Misa Jeffereis

    Dislocation and danger animate Derek Fordjour’s ramshackle architecture. For his first major solo mus-eum exhibition, the New York–based artist presents SHELTER, a jury-rigged installation that will fill the entirety of one of CAM’s eight-hundred-square-foot galleries. With dirt floors and corrugated-metal walls, the makeshift structure presents a selection of the artist’s sculptures and mixed-media paintings alongside detritus scavenged from nearby city streets. The canvases, several of which also hang on the institution’s newly revived Project Wall, address the black American experience—especially as it pertains to the spectacle of sports—and the artist’s Ghanaian heritage. Yet SHELTER is the show’s thematic focus: Providing scant protection, the ad hoc home underscores the precarity and vulnerability of migrant life.

  • “ZARINA: ATLAS OF HER WORLD”

    Pulitzer Arts Foundation
    3716 Washington Boulevard
    September 6, 2019–February 2, 2020

    Curated by Tamara H. Schenkenberg

    For decades Zarina has explored the notion of home, homeland, and her identity as a diasporic Indian artist. Nowhere can this be seen more eloquently than in Home Is a Foreign Place, 1999, a portfolio of thirty-six woodcuts portraying pared-down notations on language and place. Like millions of others, her liberal Muslim family faced displacement when the British partitioned the subcontinent into India and Pakistan in 1947. Zarina’s subsequent marriage to an Indian diplomat took her around the globe, leading her to map her memories of the different cities she has lived in, using means both spare and minimal. This show will bring together some thirty prints, sculptures, and collages dating from the 1960s to the present, placing them in dialogue with a selection of objects that have inspired the artist, including an engraving by Dürer, etchings by Rembrandt, and a Mughal-era Qur’an manuscript.