reviews

  • Ree Mantz

    Ruthermore Galler

    A jewelers craft on panels twelve by six inches, which skillfully exploit to the utmost limit the luminosity, lustrous color, and the colloidal nature of enamels. Within the vitrified surfaces One is surprised to notice the abstracted images of angels.

    —John Coplans

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  • Joan Miller Linsley

    Edward Quill Gallery

    First exhibition of this artist, whose figurative canvases are plastically naive and sweetly coloured, with the exception of a canvas entitled Eye of the Storm. A sombre, dark and more engaged piece of painting.

    —John Coplans

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  • Albert Zoc

    Eric Locke Galleries

    This sculptor appears to be recreating a certain type of Victorian ornamental metal vase which normally is thought to represent the very worst and most hideous aspect of Victorian Industrial Art.

    —John Coplans

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  • Farrar Wilson

    Eric Locke Galleries

    Wilson exhibits a series of figurative drawings and totally unrelated abstract paintings made by atomizing paint onto the canvas and then activating the surface with a series of random automitiste palette knife marks that energize the surface.

    —John Coplans

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  • Sanford Ashinger

    The Prism

    The Prism is in what was once a popular bar. Mr. Ashinger’s work is of the type one finds in serious intellectual bars: amateurish, imitative, sincere and thin.

    —Fred Martin

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  • Jerry Emanuel and Pat Emanuel

    The Studio

    It is their studio, it is their house. They may show someone else sometime. In the meantime they show their own work. They should present other artists exclusively for a few years, using the time to develop their own art, using their own eyes not their thoughts.

    —Fred Martin

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  • Werner Philipp

    Howard’s Galleries

    A premier showing of Philipp’s recent landscapes and portraits. Enough of Kokoschka, his onetime mentor, remains to rescue Phillips from the cloying sweetness of representationalism. Muted tones and expressive line.

    —E. M. Polley

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