san-francisco

Sergio Agostini

Maxwell Galleries

Mr. Agostini’s paintings are concerned with melancholy and usually autumnal agrarian landscapes. He creates a dreamlike quality by the use of horizons-at-infinity and furtive, starkly delineated figures frozen in irrelevant postures and gestures; sometimes, too, the sun is suggested as a black crescent. There are a number of variations on the subject of checkerboard fields with groups of people in the foreground holding aloft bright colored umbrellas. Mr. Agostini applies his color as densely packed, narrow parallel ribbons of paint, or, alternatively, applies a very thin pigment permitting the weave of the canvas to come through as texture. All of these idiosyncrasies of conception and technique achieve ends that are at best atmospherically decorative, but fail to be compelling.

Palmer D. French

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