san-francisco

Harry Kramer

Dilexi

The Dilexi is showing Harry Kramer. Each piece is a deliberate development of a known object into an anti-functional extension of itself which nonetheless is very active in its mechanical involvement: a relentless continuity of an absurd unfunction.

The man-made, and man-influenced nature, is present even in the more pastoral reaches of modern life as Richard McLean’s exhibition of paintings at the Berkeley Gallery attests. McLean’s cows are alert and perfect as the examples on posters for livestock shows. His fleecy ram is mounted not on a hillock or turf, but on an inclined plane of sheet metal. His healthy and sickly hens grow better with milk, the sign assures us. In the one piece of sculpture in the show a cow is up to here in rich black mud; the whole is flocked to give the feel and appearance of real cow hair, but the beast is standing stock still and looks straight ahead like a well

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