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Roy Lichtenstein

Irving Blum Gallery

That Roy Lichtenstein’s backs of canvases are something of a throwback to an earlier approach comes initially both as a relief and a vague disappointment, weary as we are on the one hand of ’30s moderne, and, on the other, secretly expectant of yet another delectable surprise. But one can only account to himself for secretly indulged tastes up to a point, and Lichtenstein, it now appears, is clever enough to measure out his soft insults with reserve. The new works, of which the Irving Blum Gallery shows six, are basically dot paintings in only three colors, black, white and yellow. They are severer and slightly more monotonous than any other series, though there is a general relationship to the old “Parthenon” image. The “Brushstrokes,” being similarly “formal,” and similarly isolating a ubiquitous painterly appearance for the sake, partially, of ridicule, are more full of conceit and less

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