new-york

Gaston Lachaise

Robert Schoelkopf Gallery

The retrospective exhibition organized by the Gaston Lachaise Foundation has at last arrived in New York City after touring these past two years and it is an event of capital importance––although it may pass relatively unnoticed. The oeuvre of the French-born and naturalized American sculptor who died in 1935, with its phenomenal mid-career shift from an extreme of classical poise to an unparalleled hedonism and sexual expressionism, is one of the most curious, nagging and still only superficially considered productions of a self-evident genius.The Foundation’s recent casting of unknown late Lachaises, the recent publication of a pretty but historically febrile biography, The Sculpture of Gaston Lachaise (1967), the grateful republication of Lachaise’s 1928 “Comment On My Sculpture,” in Barbara Rose’s Readings in American Art Since 1900 (1968), and the number of museums which have subscribed

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