new-york

Charles Burchfield

Bernard Danenberg Galleries

The early watercolors by Charles Burchfield made up a remarkable show. Burchfield is a very attractive personality, and this, plus the familiarity of his style, has tended to conspire against any very searching analysis of his work—one’s critical faculties are charmed, as it were! The watercolors in the present show were painted between 1915 and 1917, and for the critic they have the advantage of being similar enough to Burchfield’s mature work to be related to it without difficulty, but at the same time different enough to allow one to gain some perspective on the artist’s style. In the last analysis, I am not very sure how essential this is, since in any case the real interest of Burchfield’s work is not in its style but rather in the personality of its maker and his relation as an artist to his culture.

One sees in these watercolors two salient qualities, in addition to the animistic

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