New York

Greg Card

Artist's Studio

Greg Card could be one of the better younger artists. During the last part of 1969, he completed a series of paintings called Perigee, consisting of five 5 by six foot single panels, and a diptych of two more. All are basically polyester resin, with the colorant and fiberglass reinforcing added somewhere in the seven layers; Card’s pictures, unlike Davis’s, are topographically irregular, and undulate, in parts, a few inches off the wall. In one representative panel, the image is a demirandom configuration of oranges and purples in oily linear patterns, spiked with a few solids. Its look—notwithstanding the implications of food stains on a baby’s bib—is predictably sci-fi, a frequent phenomenon in these primitive days of painting on/with plastics. But Card gives hints of avoiding the primary problem of his medium—an “automatic” chemical image which could be either simple integrity to

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