new-york

John Hoyland

Andre Emmerich Downtown

John Hoyland’s paintings at Emmerich downtown are subject to the same nonproblems, but there does seem to be some evidence of thought in his work, and his work can be considered as something of a commentary on these nonproblems. Basically, three sorts of things go on in Hoyland’s new paintings: staining and drip-staining which forms the ground of each painting; squeegeed rectangular shapes of thick acrylic; and thick blobs of acrylic which appear to have been splattered against the canvas. Within this methodology, there are, at the extremes, two kinds of paintings. Some of the paintings are an obvious continuation of the strong influence of Hans Hofmann, in which rectangular squeegeed shapes occupy the center of the canvas and move out almost to its edges; in some of these paintings, the shape is an irregular right-angled shape, and in others, a set of overlapping rectangles. Between the

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