New York

Jim Dine

Sonnabend Gallery

Jim Dine’s work once seemed to lie somewhere between the constellations of Johns-Rauschenberg and Pop art. His persistent use of objects in, or dangling from paintings put him on the side of Johns and Rauschenberg, while his subject matter, such as neckties, shoes, toothbrushes, and red bandanas, often brought him closer to Pop imagery. This is not to establish Johns-Rauschenberg and Pop art as opposing poles, but only to establish Dine’s work as generally existing between two major forces. Dine’s earlier work is probably closest to Oldenburg. Their work shares almost no common physical characteristics or devices, but there is a sense of shared whimsical, comic playfulness between them. But that was in the early ’60s. Dine’s work isn’t between or particularly like anyone else’s now, but shares only what seems to me a desperation common to the work of many prominent ’60s artists, which

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