New York

Louisa Chase

Artists Space

Louisa Chase arranges painted sticks and plaster balls on round pieces of colored felt on the floor. Gallery administrator and critic Irving Sandler remarked to a crowd of visitors that Cars and Triangles looked like a model railroad. Perhaps he had Stuart Davis in the back of his mind, because Cars and Triangles, like much of that Cubist’s work, is an active and ingenious abstract composition bounded by a metaphor. These works look like games, but it’s not any game you can play. It’s more like toys left out on the floor. Chase neither infers systemic preconditions for the existence of her pieces (as did Bochner for his floor pieces), nor a possible use, as do works that mark out a space as a ritual ground. Instead Chase emphasizes the pictorial identity of the sticks and balls in her insular works as figures within a field of color. The composition is rigorous, based as it is on

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