new-york

Paula Longendyke

112 Greene Street Gallery

Paula Longendyke’s show disturbed me. It was weird and ugly, as if somebody had been given a couple of hours to put together some kind of sculpture using a staple gun and the light construction materials left over from a loft subdivision. One artist said it looked like the culmination of the 112 Gallery’s formal funk esthetic, jerry-built but nonreferential. Still, I liked Longendyke’s white corner, a tall construction she did near the pipes in the back of the gallery. Loosely laid and fractured tiles lay within a white painted square on the floor. Venetian blinds, hunks of plasterboard, and pieces of wood just barely did the job of defining walls on the wall. It looked, in fact, like part of the bathroom in a tract house wrecked by tornado. This construction also sparked a disturbing reminiscence in me of Judy Chicago’s bathroom project at the Los Angeles house she and her students

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