New York

Susan Heinemann

Artists Space

The major configuration in Susan Heinemann’s installation is a chevron formed by doubled black footprints made with charcoal and running from the comers of the room to a point somewhere in the center. If the prints signified many people standing abreast, they’d have formed a flying wedge. But it looks more as if the footprints were made by hopping. There’s a series of chicken wire cylinders, starting in one corner of the room and descending in height, each of which encloses a pair of prints. The first is about five feet high, about human stature. The others are folded back like potato sacks, becoming shorter as they move toward the triangle’s apex. After the sixth, Heinemann switches to outlining the prints in white chalk.

There’s a tendency these days to determine a work by body size, so the sculpture takes the measure of its maker. To read diminishing stature into the diminishing height

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