New York

Hamish Fulton and Jean Le Gac

Sperone Westwater Fischer Gallery and John Gibson Gallery

Travel has a universal appeal. It holds out the tantalizing hope of being able to step outside of oneself, shedding that shell of circumstance and habit that structures one’s day-to-day existence. It also has the effect of vastly sharpening perceptions. The senses are put on 24-hour alert, and the most peripheral baggage, details of which pass unnoticed at home, suddenly commands attention. Road-signs, labels, wrappers, newspapers, restaurant china, all become the focus of this heightened awareness. It’s hard to dwell on yourself when traveling; too much gets in the way.

Whether mythical or real, journeys have provided an endless source of subject matter. As often as not, voyages serve as a metaphor for life itself, charting one’s progress through time as well as space. Despite its literary popularity, traveling has not held much interest as a subject for artists’ work. Two very different

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