San Francisco

Hanna Hannah, Stan Askew, And Jean Thrift

Braunstein/Quay Gallery

In the category of growth potential, the clear winner was Hanna Hannah; even her palindromic name was intriguing. The dominant quality in her delicate paintings on paper was an emotional and formal openness. She divides the standard 22-x-30-inch sheet into a lightly pencilled grid over which she adds numerous kinds of markings that congregate near the grid lines, but do not conform to its rigidity. The effect, as in O’Banion’s paper pieces, is to obviate the necessity of the grid. The liquidy pastel strokes and random color pencil marks look downright inelegant (no mean feat): the artist’s wandering hand is not civilized by the regularizing squares. In a sense, Hannah is sharing the chance markings of Henderson; her work is as open as his to the possibility of establishing conscious decision making directed by pattern—and pattern not tied to the grid. Since Hannah works in series, such

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