new-york

Max Kozloff

Holly Solomon Gallery

There are many things going on, and many things to be said about Max Kozloff’s photographs. This is both an asset and a problem. Obviously possessed of a lively intelligence, Kozloff packs every detail in every image with meaning; I’m sure he knows exactly what he’s doing, even if I don’t. The consequence of this thoroughness is that he does all the work for the viewer.

A typical Kozlovian image reads as follows: a display of both carefully arranged and chaotic shelves of gold and silver objects which reflect light; the window in front of the display which reflects the scene across the street; trees which move in the wind, mounds of snow in the gutter; small mirrors reflecting bicycle chains which lock together bars which encase the window; on top of all this, there will be a reflection of the photographer taking the photograph. These are dense, involuted images which take absolutely nothing

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