Chicago

Ron Kohn

Allan Frumkin Gallery

Photography is always most interesting when it accomplishes things which nothing else can do: Ron Kohn is involved with one of photography’s earliest discovered uniquenesses: the camera’s ability to record light. Typically, in painting and sculpture, light is known only by its effect. In contrast, Kohn shows light with a variety of characteristics, and always as a separate substance. He works in the tradition of Aaron Siskind, which allied Moholy Nagy’s formal photogram to the non-.formal concerns of straight shooting. Thus, Kohn’s camera reports light as a substance which coexists with man and object, rather than any nonobjective, space-defying pattern.

When a boy races around a black back yard and flying light squiggles are incised into the photo surface, this is, in addition to a little boy, a product of darkness separate from light. And many of Kohn’s other subjects—ducks, ladies in

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