reviews

  • Lynn Hershman

    M.H. de Young Memorial Museum

    Lynn Hershman has established herself as a West Coast based entrepreneur/surrealist. A furnished tableau with in-the-bed mannequins at the Dante Hotel and window displays for Bon-wit Teller captured viewers’ imaginations with a combination of theatre and public relations. When a nighttime visitor to the Dante Hotel thought the tableau was vivant he called the police. They terminated the work, immediately imbuing it with eternal recognition. In New York Hershman won notoriety for being the first artist to do Bonwit’s windows since Salvador Dali broke the plate glass in the midst of a 1930s tantrum.

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  • Jack Scott

    William Sawyer Gallery

    Working on large (8 1/2 by 9 feet) unstretched canvases, Jack Scott draws charcoal arcs in a freehand style. Through placement and density the arcs create patterns of light and dark, vibrating with a luminescence unanticipated by the rawness of the materials. In previous works the arcs coalesced into amorphous forms—romantic sensations suggesting clouds, smoke or fog. With his recent works Scott introduces a concrete graphic form, large bisecting arcs that are giant magnifications of the minutely rendered arcs. Environmental romanticism yields to a bolder sensibility, as these shapes bear

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  • Beeldend Theater Group

    Floating Museum

    The Floating Museum, an alternative network that has sponsored artists’ events both in this country and Europe, occupied two galleries at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art this summer. Billed as “The Global Space Invasion Part II,” the SFMMA was host to six gallery exhibitions and several weeks of continuous performance art. Artists from Holland, France and Australia participated, as well as legions of local artists. Nevertheless, with the exception of a few performance works and sporadic gallery selections. the “Invasion” evidenced an unfocused, free-for-all atmosphere.

    The most notable

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  • Darryl Sapien

    Floating Museum

    Darryl Sapien has staged several important performance works in which a central concept is conflict or opposition culminating in celebratory resolution. Often dramatic in location or ritualization, Sapien employed only one or two characters, carrying out simple but thought-provoking activities. In his performances there exists both a sense of positivism and feeling for humanity.

    Crime in the Streets, staged in Adler Alley in North Beach, was a magnification of the artist’s concerns which employed a large cast. props, including a vertically expanding forklift, and a futuristic script on urban

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