New York

Edward Mayer

O.K. Harris Gallery

With unfinished strips of wood lath as his only construction material, Edward Myer weaves large towers and huts that combine a blunt, overall sense of solidity with visible internal structure. While countless comparisons with other artists come to mind at first glance—early Aycock, Stackhouse, self-contained Winsors and modular Ferarras—somehow Mayer’s pieces are strong enough to emerge as the work of a thorough, knowledgeable individual worth watching.

Unexpected details save the pieces from a too-simple overall profile. Basically, each sculpture has a fairly simple shape so this attention to detail is essential if the works are to survive their own obvious solutions. For instance, a large square “hut” dominates one section of the room. A basic four-sided structure with a sloped, typical roofline, the piece is broken up unexpectedly by external lines caused by the construction

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