reviews

  • Alexis Smith

    Rosamund Felsen Gallery

    A friend of mine has a term for the continuing spate, in art, of miniature sculpture (particularly little houses), born-again tacky decor, “bad” figuration, videotaped dog acts, verbal/visual one-liners, rhinestone paintings, all the varieties of post-Conceptual, post-everything cuddliness and whimsy. He calls it Cutism. This implies that the stuff is all a lollipop plague, and I don’t agree, but you don’t have to agree with a good, bitchy crack to find it useful in sorting out your responses. You can start testing for work that fits the letter but eludes the mean spirit of the designation: Are

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  • Laddie John Dill

    California Institute of Technology

    My favorite works by Laddie John Dill were made around 1972–73: long, narrow cast wedges of cement in which are inserted troughs of glass holding cement wedges that slope in the opposite direction. The cement members blend into each other at the ends. The unit, which looks as if it weighs at least a ton, rests on the floor. Works of an airless but conceptually tough elegance, the wedge pieces balance brute physicality and precise cerebral ambiguity. For instance, does the bottom wedge contain the glass which contains the top wedge, or is the glass contained, sandwich-fashion, by the cement?—in

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  • Alexis Smith

    Rosamund Felsen Gallery

    A friend of mine has a term for the continuing spate, in art, of miniature sculpture (particularly little houses), born-again tacky decor, “bad” figuration, videotaped dog acts, verbal/visual one-liners, rhinestone paintings, all the varieties of post-Conceptual, post-everything cuddliness and whimsy. He calls it Cutism. This implies that the stuff is all a lollipop plague, and I don’t agree, but you don’t have to agree with a good, bitchy crack to find it useful in sorting out your responses. You can start testing for work that fits the letter but eludes the mean spirit of the designation: Are

    Read more
  • Laddie John Dill

    California Institute of Technology

    My favorite works by Laddie John Dill were made around 1972–73: long, narrow cast wedges of cement in which are inserted troughs of glass holding cement wedges that slope in the opposite direction. The cement members blend into each other at the ends. The unit, which looks as if it weighs at least a ton, rests on the floor. Works of an airless but conceptually tough elegance, the wedge pieces balance brute physicality and precise cerebral ambiguity. For instance, does the bottom wedge contain the glass which contains the top wedge, or is the glass contained, sandwich-fashion, by the cement?—in

    Read more