reviews

  • Judy Dater

    Grapestake Gallery

    Judy Dater’s recognition in the early 1970s came from her portraits of women. These pictures were collaborative fantasies, in which subject and photographer created tableaus representing fragments of female experience. Photographing women involved self-exploration for Dater, and the strength of these works rests in the manifestation of this involvement. Pictures of men—exhibited for the first time as a group—display inconsistency. From a visual standpoint they are dynamic: larger than her previous work (16 by 20 inches rather than 11 by 14 inches), using more direct light and graphic composition.

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  • Ron Nagle

    SFAI Walter and McBean Galleries

    As a second-generation California ceramist, Ron Nagle’s small, intricately glazed vestigial cups are most closely related to the works of Ken Price. However, Nagle moves beyond restatement or imitation to create highly original pieces that are rich in nuance and form. The “Yama” series, from which the nine pieces on exhibition were selected, is inspired by Japanese Momoyama ware, a style noted for its looseness, texture and emotional feel. In his use of deliberately sensual and unanticipated color, Nagle, nevertheless, shows equal consideration for a palette often associated with southern

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  • Daniel Wiener

    80 Langton Street

    Surrounded by sand, Daniel Wiener’s Catwalk II intersected the gallery. A domed arc form, constructed of plastic and suspended from the ceiling, hovered over one side of the installation; a gallery door sealed in plastic and a twisted plastic shape occupied other parts of the space. In addition, seven small, ritualistic-looking sculptures, crafted primarily of wood and spun materials, were individually lit by bare light-bulbs. These operated as subtle focal points within the overall installation.

    The wooden catwalk itself functioned as a boardwalk and the sporadic lights with sand reflections

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  • Judy Dater

    Grapestake Gallery

    Judy Dater’s recognition in the early 1970s came from her portraits of women. These pictures were collaborative fantasies, in which subject and photographer created tableaus representing fragments of female experience. Photographing women involved self-exploration for Dater, and the strength of these works rests in the manifestation of this involvement. Pictures of men—exhibited for the first time as a group—display inconsistency. From a visual standpoint they are dynamic: larger than her previous work (16 by 20 inches rather than 11 by 14 inches), using more direct light and graphic composition.

    Read more
  • Ron Nagle

    SFAI Walter and McBean Galleries

    As a second-generation California ceramist, Ron Nagle’s small, intricately glazed vestigial cups are most closely related to the works of Ken Price. However, Nagle moves beyond restatement or imitation to create highly original pieces that are rich in nuance and form. The “Yama” series, from which the nine pieces on exhibition were selected, is inspired by Japanese Momoyama ware, a style noted for its looseness, texture and emotional feel. In his use of deliberately sensual and unanticipated color, Nagle, nevertheless, shows equal consideration for a palette often associated with southern

    Read more
  • Daniel Wiener

    80 Langton Street

    Surrounded by sand, Daniel Wiener’s Catwalk II intersected the gallery. A domed arc form, constructed of plastic and suspended from the ceiling, hovered over one side of the installation; a gallery door sealed in plastic and a twisted plastic shape occupied other parts of the space. In addition, seven small, ritualistic-looking sculptures, crafted primarily of wood and spun materials, were individually lit by bare light-bulbs. These operated as subtle focal points within the overall installation.

    The wooden catwalk itself functioned as a boardwalk and the sporadic lights with sand reflections

    Read more