reviews

  • Adolf Wölfli

    Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago (MCA Chicago)

    The current exhibition of Adolph Wölfli’s (1864–1930) drawings, book illustrations, collages and musical scores is provocative in several respects. His visual art all concerns either his own personal life or the fictitious exploits of the child Doufi and St. Adolph II, both autobiographical characters Wölfli created in his 19,500-page epic saga, From the Cradle to the Grave. Or, through work and sweat, suffering and ordeals, even through prayer into damnation.

    Pictured themes include landscapes, shipwrecks, fires, storms, crucifixions, death plunges, rape, incest and tables of names and numbers

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  • Beverly Feldmann

    Nancy Lurie and A.R.C. galleries

    The tone of Beverly Feldmann’s drawings and performances is a childlike sort of realism. Primitivistic drawings use a simple visual layout: usually black and white, pen and ink picture on top and handwritten commentary below—unpretentious visions which can give a hint of the type of things which may lead children out of blissful innocence and into hardened adulthood. The naive renderings of chairs, windows, doors, and hallways add a lingering ironic voice to her best work. One picture communicates the story of a little girl who was tied to a post all day and considered crazy, and the characteristic

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  • Adolf Wölfli

    Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago (MCA Chicago)

    The current exhibition of Adolph Wölfli’s (1864–1930) drawings, book illustrations, collages and musical scores is provocative in several respects. His visual art all concerns either his own personal life or the fictitious exploits of the child Doufi and St. Adolph II, both autobiographical characters Wölfli created in his 19,500-page epic saga, From the Cradle to the Grave. Or, through work and sweat, suffering and ordeals, even through prayer into damnation.

    Pictured themes include landscapes, shipwrecks, fires, storms, crucifixions, death plunges, rape, incest and tables of names and numbers

    Read more
  • Beverly Feldmann

    Nancy Lurie and A.R.C. galleries

    The tone of Beverly Feldmann’s drawings and performances is a childlike sort of realism. Primitivistic drawings use a simple visual layout: usually black and white, pen and ink picture on top and handwritten commentary below—unpretentious visions which can give a hint of the type of things which may lead children out of blissful innocence and into hardened adulthood. The naive renderings of chairs, windows, doors, and hallways add a lingering ironic voice to her best work. One picture communicates the story of a little girl who was tied to a post all day and considered crazy, and the characteristic

    Read more