New York

Robert Heinecken

Light Gallery

Robert Heinecken’s show consists of innumerable Polaroids grouped on cardboard with pencil-written texts. Right inside the door he has posted a quasi-advertisement, a predominantly textual piece leaning heavily on words like “interesting,” “increase your pleasure,” “you will achieve,” and of course, “new, improved”—advertising hype about how to draw with a Polaroid. This kind of post-modernist littering with ideas is really dated: the cheerful entrepreneur with a chip on his shoulder. But the work describes Heinecken’s Polaroid adventure—he manipulates the Polaroids by squeezing the emulsion à la Lucas Samaras, rephotographing stages in the instant developing process, depicting other photographs, etc. It’s a collection of efficient gags. The work interpenetrates—the same photograph or a variant will appear in different groupings. But they are clues that lead to no treasure, repetitions

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