reviews

  • Tom Wudl

    Center of Creative Studies

    Tom Wudl’s paintings continue to be anomalies, even in a town full of anomalous, isolated artists. His work of the last year or so, minus one large and obviously significant painting, was shown recently. The absence of the big painting, a three-panel, gold-leaf extravaganza that seems to be a compendium of Wudl’s symbols, prevents the clearest possible understanding of the other pictures, just as the inclusion of two small gouache drawings—the latest work—complicates any prognostication.

    All of Wudl’s mature work has been eccentric, both in imagery and its luxurious sensuality. His paper

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  • “Dialogue/Discourse/Research”

    Santa Barbara Museum of Art

    “Dialogue/Discourse/Research’’ gathers six people—David Antin, Eleanor Antin, Helen and Newton Harrison, Fred Lonidier, and Barbara Strasen. Despite a rhetorical attempt to consider the six allied by a post-modernist attitude, in that ”they recognize that there is no domain of human investigation that can not also be the province of the visual artist," the evidence as shown here supports no such alliance. Mr. Antin, as a poet, hardly qualifies as a visual artist—his contribution to the exhibition is a transcript of a recitation he made at the museum. Similarly, Strasen’s work is really not

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  • Tom Wudl

    Center of Creative Studies

    Tom Wudl’s paintings continue to be anomalies, even in a town full of anomalous, isolated artists. His work of the last year or so, minus one large and obviously significant painting, was shown recently. The absence of the big painting, a three-panel, gold-leaf extravaganza that seems to be a compendium of Wudl’s symbols, prevents the clearest possible understanding of the other pictures, just as the inclusion of two small gouache drawings—the latest work—complicates any prognostication.

    All of Wudl’s mature work has been eccentric, both in imagery and its luxurious sensuality. His paper

    Read more
  • “Dialogue/Discourse/Research”

    Santa Barbara Museum of Art

    “Dialogue/Discourse/Research’’ gathers six people—David Antin, Eleanor Antin, Helen and Newton Harrison, Fred Lonidier, and Barbara Strasen. Despite a rhetorical attempt to consider the six allied by a post-modernist attitude, in that ”they recognize that there is no domain of human investigation that can not also be the province of the visual artist," the evidence as shown here supports no such alliance. Mr. Antin, as a poet, hardly qualifies as a visual artist—his contribution to the exhibition is a transcript of a recitation he made at the museum. Similarly, Strasen’s work is really not

    Read more