new-york

Frank Young

Hal Bromm Gallery

At last . . . real expressionist paintings. Just when everything from graffiti to a faucet with a drip is being described as expressionistic, there arrives a body of work that recalls the earlier, uncompromised meaning of the word. Frank Young’s paintings have a raw intensity that seems wrenched from a truly uncensored impulse. His six large canvases (most of them roughly eight by six feet), convey a sense of gestural violence only barely held in check by a mediating figurative concern. The surface quality is lush and, odd as it may sound, sophisticated. Francis Bacon, Georg Baselitz, and Willem de Kooning come to mind; the similarities are there and comparisons would be neither unwarranted nor embarrassing. What is instantly communicable in these paintings is a genuine, madly indulgent passion for the act of painting.

The subject matter attempts to equal and absorb the violence of the

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