New York

“Tron”

Tron is another in the current crop of glossy tech movies. It is a cute and flashy piece of propaganda which argues for democratized access to computer technology. This scenario places it amid the “us versus them-isms,” that never-ending litany of unbalanced dualities which results in the classic narrative-film conventions of cowboys and Indians, cops and robbers, and the good and the bad.

On the side of “good” are Alan and Lora (Bruce Boxleitner and Cindy Morgan), who are employees of a vast media conglomerate called Encom, and Flynn (the wonderfully heroic slob Jeff Bridges), a maverick whiz kid dismissed by the company after they handily appropriated his program for a successful video game, “Space Paranoids.” The three join forces to challenge corporate tyranny and to retrieve the data that proves Flynn’s authorship of the game. Their ignoble adversaries are Dillinger (David Warner),

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