New York

Sigmar Polke

Marian Goodman Gallery | New York

If, for purposes of discussion, Long may be a con artist, Sigmar Polke is a criminal investigator, relentlessly juxtaposing “eyewitness” accounts. Confronted with a blatant sex bomb, a realtor sees only commerce and offers her and her mate an igloo to house her emphatic curves (Igloo, 1983). The “painting” of skyscrapers behind him demonstrates that he understands a different version of passion. In what might be taken for a companion piece, Untitled, 1983, another middle-aged, balding man prefers the lure of sex to the tame real estate of a painted landscape he attempts to hang. A pun on arousal, the painting will not stay up. Art fails; in a sense, sex fails, since all the events take place in the bottom half of the canvas—everything seeks its lowest level. In each of these cartoons the paintings-within-paintings themselves make a complicated allegory. Igloo’s painting of skyscrapers is

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