reviews

  • Melissa Miller

    Contemporary Arts Museum

    When it comes to a good animal act, humans generally seem to be easy prey. Poodles leaping through hoops, grinning chimps tying trash bags, or rearing stallions kicking their hooves against the jagged profile of the Rockies all trigger responses which seem innate. But our responses in situations where animals are given center stage are guided less by biological memory than by sign systems which have a long history. A mythology of the “secret” language of animals has been assimilated and significantly transformed in the course of a long odyssey from nature to culture. Images of animals serve as

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  • Alfred Leslie

    Texas Gallery

    A small selection (five) of Alfred Leslie’s oil paintings and 34 of his black watercolor landscapes from the series “100 Views Along the Road” (1977–83) clarified the remarkable contrast between the starkness of the artist’s well-known portraiture style and the warmth of his intimate views of the American landscape. I had always admired Leslie’s early abstract painting, but felt no rapport with his portraits; to me, they’ve always seemed rather cold and unfeeling. I was therefore struck by the romantic softness of the landscapes. Though technically as complicated and sophisticated as any of

    Read more
  • Melissa Miller

    Contemporary Arts Museum

    When it comes to a good animal act, humans generally seem to be easy prey. Poodles leaping through hoops, grinning chimps tying trash bags, or rearing stallions kicking their hooves against the jagged profile of the Rockies all trigger responses which seem innate. But our responses in situations where animals are given center stage are guided less by biological memory than by sign systems which have a long history. A mythology of the “secret” language of animals has been assimilated and significantly transformed in the course of a long odyssey from nature to culture. Images of animals serve as

    Read more
  • Alfred Leslie

    Texas Gallery

    A small selection (five) of Alfred Leslie’s oil paintings and 34 of his black watercolor landscapes from the series “100 Views Along the Road” (1977–83) clarified the remarkable contrast between the starkness of the artist’s well-known portraiture style and the warmth of his intimate views of the American landscape. I had always admired Leslie’s early abstract painting, but felt no rapport with his portraits; to me, they’ve always seemed rather cold and unfeeling. I was therefore struck by the romantic softness of the landscapes. Though technically as complicated and sophisticated as any of

    Read more