New York

J. S. G. Boggs

Jeffrey Neale Gallery

Conceptual art has the potential of working as a mental stimulant in two contrary ways. There is the sort of conceptual expression that is a cryptic gesture, rich in meaning and equivocal in reading. There is also an emphatically less subtle idea art that is conceived and executed as a critically bold and pointed reflection of the culturally accepted norm. The tactics of J. S. G. Boggs’ art certainly belong to the latter of these two modes of conceptualism. While we might miss in Boggs the lyrical ambiguity of the first mode, his work is appealing in its keen ideological clarity and precision and its striking format.

Boggs’ drawings present an uncomfortable dichotomy in its most minimal terms. He challenges our contemporary social and esthetic status quo with a tension not of multiplicity but of two highly charged identities skillfully spliced together yet schizophrenically at odds with

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