Toronto

Brian Boigon

S. L. Simpson Gallery

In an installation called Mondrian's Holiday, 1983, Brian Boigon sent up Modernism's most famous hater of green. A white garden chair, a tall highball glass, a folded towel, and a funky portable radio conjured the master in wet swimming trunks, staring into the blue, away from an unpainted paint-by-number landscape drawn in outline on the wall. Although the point was elusive, the piece was good fun, offering what at the time was a welcome tone of address.

The question is whether the welcome is wearing thin. Boigon's new work is fun and irreverent too. He has put together a series of constructions that are partly two-dimensional image-grids and partly what he calls “nu-constructivist assemblies.” In each piece the three-dimensional assembly holds the foreground, hovering out and away from the image-grid below. Made of chrome and aluminum building supplies, they recall El Lissitzky's “Prouns”

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