rome

Bruno Ceccobelli

Sala 1

It’s difficult to say if this show of Bruno Ceccobelli’s work was an installation, a set design, or a happening. It consisted of a single room-size environmental piece, entitled Natività (Nativity, 1987), made up of several dozen sculptures of various kinds laid out like a Neapolitan Christmas crèche. Although none of the traditional elements were actually represented (i.e., the Madonna, Christ child, or manger), it was obviously modeled after a typical Nativity scene; the show was even timed to coincide with the holidays, from Christmas eve to Epiphany. But instead of a crowd of puppets paying homage to the infant Jesus, Ceccobelli’s crèche was an extraordinary “staging” of the art of this century, constructed out of an assortment of found objects, paint, wood, and nails in a setting of marble fragments—remnants of Roman capitals, pediments, and other artifacts from classical ruins. In

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