New York

Creation, The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari

La MaMa Galleria

Nearly 70 years after its premiere, The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari continues to attract theatrical adapters. It’s not hard to see why. Structured and staged like a Jacobean revenge tragedy, the silent movie displays a dramatic range that is practically Shakespearean, from moments of supernatural horror to the larger allegorical theme of institutional power run amok. Interwoven with these classically theatrical elements are a feverish Weimar psychosexual angst and an Expressionist mise-en-scène that give this unusual art-film period piece the appearance of a quintessentially modern myth.

As a conceptually controlled melodrama, the movie made perfect material for Creation, a collaborative theater ensemble that combines dance, music, and architecture in their mixed-media theatrical productions. The company’s staged version, adapted and directed by Creation member Susan Mosakowski, was an amazingly

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