new-york

Perry Hoberman

Postmasters

In his recent show of horizontal Plexiglas lightboxes, Perry Hoberman used state-of-the-art computer technology to create an effect that, ironically, is closely associated with the 1950s—namely, that of 3-D, stereoscopic imagery. Hoberman first takes pictures from advertising and film stills, then processes them with computer-graphics programs (some devised by the artist himself) and finally prints them onto transparencies with a color ink-jet plotter. These techniques enable him not only to make stereoscopic pictures, but to colorize, solarize, distort, and otherwise manipulate the image. Although Hoberman has worked with 3-D special effects for quite a while, he’s usually used slide projections or installations, both of which have required the viewer to don glasses with special red-and-blue lenses. Now he has built the viewing apparatus right into the artwork by incorporating red and

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