munich

Haralampi Oroschakoff

Galerie Kluser

Haralampi Oroschakoff’s paintings consist of painted fragments, which are applied to the surface of a canvas like found ancient shards. One occasionally recognizes a hand, an eye, perhaps even a whole bearded face, and, in between, brush strokes—timid, cautious, irresolute, marked by awe and a touch of anxiety, as if the artist were bearing witness to an epochal event. Oroschakoff approaches painting through Byzantine culture, in particular through the world of Russian icons. In 1966, when he was 14 years old, the artist and his family moved from Eastern Europe to Vienna; recently feeling a discontent with the civilization of Western Europe, he has returned to his own Russian Orthodox roots. The icons he admires, unlike Western art, show little progressive development. Not created by human hands (according to the religious belief), they have, for centuries, remained true to an intrinsically

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