paris

Richard Texier

National Museum of Women in the Arts

Art, commerce, collectibles, silicon chips, and the bicentennial of the French Revolution: there could hardly be a better recipe for disaster than the makings of Richard Texier’s La petite suite des Droits de l’Homme (The little human rights suite, 1989). And yet, as Galileo once said, it moves. The piece is a limited edition of seven prints, issued by L’Avant-Musée to commemorate the French declaration of human rights of August 1789. The images themselves are derived from an equal number of monumental tapestries that Texier was commissioned to design earlier in the year. But this little version is no mere spinoff, or at least not one primarily suitable for framing, insofar as it is printed on the pocket-sized telephone credit cards known in France as télécartes.

Admittedly, the link between the bicentennial and the télécarte is not obvious, but it does exist, metaphorically and otherwise.

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