cologne

Walter Kütz

Johnen + Schöttle

Employing glue-soaked bundles of ragged textiles, Walter Kütz creates configurations that suggest body parts, internal organs, animal legs, or wings. In one instance, a horse’s head formed from old coats, jackets, trousers, and blankets, looms from a wooden bookcase like a gothic gargoyle. Filled with tension and flowing movement, the creased cloth even suggests the animal’s wide open nostrils and pulled back mouth. The tension in Kütz’s sculptures is produced not only by the form that results from the subjugation of the material; the energy seems to be inherent in the twists and folds of the bundled cloth.

Hearts, made of stuffed cushions and dyed red, are symbolic statements within Kütz’s oeuvre. As the place of sensation, of pain and grief, the heart is his point of departure. Kütz is not interested in the abstract, death-defying ideas that we normally try to immortalize in art, literature

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