new-york

Howard Halle

Randy Alexander

Though some have referred to Howard Halle’s work as neo-Conceptual, no less likely moniker could be found to describe what he does. Forget explorations designed to reveal or challenge mechanisms of meaning in art; Halle’s work amounts to little more than a thin form of social realism for the ’90s. Its focus is the middle-class, suburban milieu. As if we didn’t know this already, Halle seems bent on telling us that all is not right in the bucolic ’burbs.

His re-creation of this environment, vaguely reminiscent of the make-believe habitats created in putt-putt golf courses, is tastefully sparse and cleverly animated by a sense of dark humor befitting a Stephen King scenario: everything looks right for a moment, and then the goblins come out to play. Wall-to-wall plush-pile sod blankets the gallery floor, simulating the tide of manicured green that stretches coast to coast. Some decorative

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