New York

Vulto

Sandra Gering Gallery

Smoke emerges, accumulates, and dissolves. It usually exists only if something is being destroyed, which is why it also stands for the transformation of matter into the immaterial. Though smoke is always intangible, it permeates everything. Indeed, it is these traces that Vulto pursues.

He smokes fish, whole fish or just their heads, loose fish, and also fish that are gingerly wrapped in cloth, which makes them look injured and bandaged. These fish are then lined up in boxes and vitrines, hung up close together on strings stretched on a wooden frame, or suspended very casually on threads attached to the ceiling. Here Vulto presented rows of glass cases containing smoked, dried, and salted fish. Brown-stained bandages could be seen in the vitrines, and everything reeked of smoke. Even the catalogue accompanying the exhibition exuded that pungent odor—it too was smoked.

However, it is not just

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