Zurich

Christoph Rütimann

Mai 36 Galerie

Compared with Christoph Rütimann’s skepticism about our perceptual abilities, Gertrude Stein’s famous dictum, “A rose is a rose. . .,” sounds downright dogmatic or at least too clear-cut. Is a horizontal line painted by a brush simply a line? Does it describe a horizon? Does it define a distance or even a space? Perhaps it merely registers a movement across the surface. Rütimann’s response to such questions might have had the character of alternative suggestions, but instead, they have a “both-this-and-that” quality—similar to the description of a scientific model, which deliberately fails to explain two phenomena simultaneously. Thus, one line may emerge even when countless sheets of stacked paper have the same horizontal line printed on their middle. If we view this stack from the side, the printed edges of the single sheets add up to a single vertical line. The original thickness of

Sign-in to keep reading

Artforum print subscribers have full access to this article. If you are a subscriber, sign in below.

Not registered for artforum.com? Register here.

SUBSCRIBE NOW for only $50 a year—65% off the newsstand price—and get the print magazine plus full online access to this issue and our archive.*

Order the PRINT EDITION of the April 1992 issue for $17 or the ONLINE EDITION for $5.99.

* This rate applies to U.S. domestic subscriptions.