New York

Jeffrey Wisniewski

Nordanstad-Skarstedt

Maybe the art world is hopelessly jaded, maybe entrenched recession malaise has sent us in search of diversions of any sort, maybe the cyclical revival of interest in ’70s-style radical art has opened long-closed doors. Whatever the reason, it’s been a season of stunts and provocations. Jeffrey Wisniewski’s recent dismantling of an entire suburban house in Briarcliff Manor, N.Y.. which he then had fed through a portable stump recycler—reducing the entire edifice to wood chips—and transported to a gallery for exhibition, offers the novelty of an outrageous act strategically reinforced as a recycling of ’70s precedents.

The dismembering of an unassuming suburban dwelling echoes Gordon Matta-Clark’s Splitting: Four Corners, 1974, in which the artist chain-sawed a house in half, though Wisniewski’s kamikaze demolition contrasts with Matta-Clark’s sensitivity to the poetics of the original spaces

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