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Julia Scher

Galerie Zwirner

This exhibition of Julia Scher’s works seemed to say that art has to be a partner with life. Does this mean more realism, more real-life references, more social relevance? Art’s content, if it could be exactly defined, would thus be a more-or-less direct expression of life and the creation of images that would reproduce life. For this reason Scher’s work has a dramatic effect as its goal. That this effect works on a social and linguistic level, as well as on a moral and psychological one seems not to matter. For this work’s primary area was the gallery, as the title of the installation, Zwirners Verlies (Zwirner’s dungeon, 1992), demonstrated.

As a complicated video installation with 12 monitors and 15 cameras, the installation took place on all three levels of the gallery; but the true dungeon with bars and chains was located in the basement level. The images on the monitors played with

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