new-york

Marilyn Lerner

Robert Morrison Gallery

As many critics have noticed, Marilyn Lerner’s eccentrically shaped, hard-edged abstract paintings often seem like playful yet exacting conflations of Russian Constructivism and Suprematism, on the one hand, and South Asian art—particularly Tantric—on the other. It’s a rare synthesis—centrifugal dynamism from one source, contemplative metastasis from the other—but one that’s compellingly achieved in her best work.

An inveterate traveler to Asia, as well as a long-standing admirer of its traditional arts, Lerner, in early 1991, became more actively involved with Asian art by studying Indian gouache painting techniques with a traditional master in Jaipur, in the province of Rajasthan. “The Jaipur Gouaches,” 1991–92, are the fruit of that effort, although despite the title they were not painted in India (where Lerner stuck strictly to copying miniatures in the approved manner), but back in

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